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Niels "N" Mortensen

Passenger Ship "Monarch of the Sea" Voyage Across the Pacific.


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1861 (p. 154-156) On Thursday, May 9,1861, a company of 565 Scandinavian Saints ( 373 Danish, 128 Swedish and 6-l Norwegian ) sailed from Copenagen by steamer "Waldemar." Pres. John Van Cott, who accompanied them to England, joined the emigrants at Kiel. Elders Hans Olin Hansen, Niels Wilhelmsen, Jens Nielsen, Gustaf A. Ohlson, Saamund Gudmundsen, Carl W. J. Hecker, Anders Frantzen and others returned home or emigrated with this company, after having labored faithfully as missionaries in the Scandinavian Mission. After a successful voyage the company arrived at Kiel in the morning of May 10th, and were a: once forwarded by special train to Altona, where they arrived about noon. In Altona the company was divided in two parts, of which one (about 200 Saints) immediately boarded the steamer "Brittania" and departed for Hull, England, about 3 p. m. the same day. They arrived at Hull May 12th. The second division (169 souls), having been quartered in a large hall over night, left Hamburg May 11, 1861, at about 3 p. m. by steamer "Eugenia," which, after a pleasant voyage, arrived at Grimsby, England, on the morning of May 13th. The captain of this vessel treated the emigrants with all due respect and kindness, while the Opposite was the case on the steamer "Brittania." The two companies joined together again at Grimsby, where they were comfortably cared for until the morning of May 14th, when they proceeded by special train to Liverpool, arriving, in that city about 2 p. m. Two hours later they were placed on board the ship "The Monarch of the Sea," the largest vessel that had carried Latter-day Saint emigrants across the Atlantic up to that date. This company of Saints was also until then the largest to cross the Ocean on one ship. Or. May 16th, the company was organized by Presidents Amasa M. Lyman, Chas. C. Rich and Geo. Q. Cannon, who appointed Elder Jabez Woodard from Switzerland, president, with Hans Olin Hansen and Niels Wilhelmsen as his counselors. At 11 a.m. the great vessel lifted anchor, and, amid great cheers of parting friends, the ship left the wharf and began its long voyage. Later the large company was divided into districts, the Scandinavian in seven and the English and Germans into three or four, each under a president. The names of these presidents were: Edward Read, John J. P. Wallace, Horace Pegg. Peter Nielsen, Saamund Gudmundsen, Gustaf A. Ohlson, Aaron G. Oman, Lars C. Geertsen, Johan Fagerberg and Rasmus Nielsen; the latter also acted as marshal for the Scandinavians. Elias L. T. Harrison was appointed chief secretary, while Lars C. Geertsen was chosen to act as clerk for the Scandinavians. The emigrants were kindly treated by both officers and crew on shipboard and the provisions were good and sufficient. Some inconvenience was experienced in getting the food cooked on the ranges, on account of the great number of pots and kettles to be served in the kitchen, and on this account each family could only cook five times each week. The sick were treated to wine and beer; the adults received boiled sago and the children had milk. On the voyage from Copenhagen to New York nine persons, most of whom were children, died; 14 couples were married and four births took place on board. Of the marriages 11couples were Scandinavians. Among them were Anders Frantzen of the Aarhus Conference and Maren Mortensen of the Copenhagen Conference. Saamund Gudmundsen and Ellen Maria Mork of the Brevig Conference, and Carl W. J. Hecker and Karen Marie Madsen of the Vendsyssel Conference. The weather was favorable most of the time during the voyage; the ship, however, had to battle against the wind a couple of days. Large icebergs were passed among which was one judged to tower 200 feet high above water. On June 19th the "Monarch of the Sea" arrived in New York, where the company was met by Elders Jones and Williams and lodged at Castle Garden. Apostle Erastus Snow, who also happened to be in New York at the time, spoke to the Scandinavians in the Danish language. From New York the company traveled by rail and steamboat (part of the way in two divisions) to Florence, Neb., the first division arriving at Florence July 1st, and the second July 2nd. The route taken was about the same as the year before (via Dunkirk, Cleveland, Chicago, Quincy, St. Joseph, etc.). Preparations for the journey across the Plains were at once made and all who had not the means to fit themselves out for the long journey were assisted by teams from Utah, which this year for the first time were sent in large companies by the Church to the Missouri River to assist the poor Saints in gathering to Zion. Most of the Scandinavians grants assisted in this manner crossed the Plains in Capt. John R. Murdock's company, which left Florence in the beginning of July and arrived in Salt Lake City, Sept. 12th. The rest of the emigrants--those who possessedsufficient means to help themselves–left Florence a few days later under the leadership of Captain Samuel A. Woolley with about 60 ox-teams. After traveling for some distance, the company was divided into two sections, and Elder Porter was appointed captain of the second division. On Sunday, Sept. 22nd, this company arrived safely in Salt Lake dress. 1861 (p. 154-156) On Thursday, May 9,1861, a company of 565 Scandinavian Saints ( 373 Danish, 128 Swedish and 6-l Norwegian ) sailed from Copenagen by steamer "Waldemar." Pres. John Van Cott, who accompanied them to England, joined the emigrants at Kiel. Elders Hans Olin Hansen, Niels Wilhelmsen, Jens Nielsen, Gustaf A. Ohlson, Saamund Gudmundsen, Carl W. J. Hecker, Anders Frantzen and others returned home or emigrated with this company, after having labored faithfully as missionaries in the Scandinavian Mission. After a successful voyage the company arrived at Kiel in the morning of May 10th, and were a: once forwarded by special train to Altona, where they arrived about noon. In Altona the company was divided in two parts, of which one (about 200 Saints) immediately boarded the steamer "Brittania" and departed for Hull, England, about 3 p. m. the same day. They arrived at Hull May 12th. The second division (169 souls), having been quartered in a large hall over night, left Hamburg May 11, 1861, at about 3 p. m. by steamer "Eugenia," which, after a pleasant voyage, arrived at Grimsby, England, on the morning of May 13th. The captain of this vessel treated the emigrants with all due respect and kindness, while the Opposite was the case on the steamer "Brittania." The two companies joined together again at Grimsby, where they were comfortably cared for until the morning of May 14th, when they proceeded by special train to Liverpool, arriving, in that city about 2 p. m. Two hours later they were placed on board the ship "The Monarch of the Sea," the largest vessel that had carried Latter-day Saint emigrants across the Atlantic up to that date. This company of Saints was also until then the largest to cross the Ocean on one ship. Or. May 16th, the company was organized by Presidents Amasa M. Lyman, Chas. C. Rich and Geo. Q. Cannon, who appointed Elder Jabez Woodard from Switzerland, president, with Hans Olin Hansen and Niels Wilhelmsen as his counselors. At 11 a.m. the great vessel lifted anchor, and, amid great cheers of parting friends, the ship left the wharf and began its long voyage. Later the large company was divided into districts, the Scandinavian in seven and the English and Germans into three or four, each under a president. The names of these presidents were: Edward Read, John J. P. Wallace, Horace Pegg. Peter Nielsen, Saamund Gudmundsen, Gustaf A. Ohlson, Aaron G. Oman, Lars C. Geertsen, Johan Fagerberg and Rasmus Nielsen; the latter also acted as marshal for the Scandinavians. Elias L. T. Harrison was appointed chief secretary, while Lars C. Geertsen was chosen to act as clerk for the Scandinavians. The emigrants were kindly treated by both officers and crew on shipboard and the provisions were good and sufficient. Some inconvenience was experienced in getting the food cooked on the ranges, on account of the great number of pots and kettles to be served in the kitchen, and on this account each family could only cook five times each week. The sick were treated to wine and beer; the adults received boiled sago and the children had milk. On the voyage from Copenhagen to New York nine persons, most of whom were children, died; 14 couples were married and four births took place on board. Of the marriages 11couples were Scandinavians. Among them were Anders Frantzen of the Aarhus Conference and Maren Mortensen of the Copenhagen Conference. Saamund Gudmundsen and Ellen Maria Mork of the Brevig Conference, and Carl W. J. Hecker and Karen Marie Madsen of the Vendsyssel Conference.

 

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